IMG_1969_edited.jpg

BE THE MAGPIE

PhD’ing on tactile access to microscopic objects. All about anthropology, archaeology, museums, cats and bad puns. Tell me your favourite history fact.

Search
  • Kate

Updated: Jan 2, 2020

Let me just get it out there and say that I will not be delving into British politics this week, even with everything going on. Not with a ten foot pole. There are many other bloggers and reporters who have laid it out for those not in the UK, and I would direct you there instead. Seriously, it’ll do my head in otherwise. The only thing I will say is that as an American, I am not allowed to vote. Even though I live here, I can only exercise that right if I become a citizen when eligible in the next 3.5 years. If I were a Canadian or an Australian I could, but apparently if your country left the Motherland like a teenager running away from home and crashing the car whilst doing it, you don’t get to vote while living here.


Also, my heart aches for the latest tragedy to unfold in this beautiful country with the massive fire happening in London and now the attack on people worshipping. The people of the city were amazing as ever though, and so many donations of food, clothing, and basic necessities poured in that collection centres had to turn some of it away. Londoners may not always be the friendliest on the Tube, but they’re always there to look out for other humans in need. ❤


In brighter(ish) news – there’ll be one less reason for spam phone calls here in the UK soon! PPI – or payment protection insurance was a policy sold alongside loans that was meant to cover any loan repayments if you lost your job or got sick. Unfortunately, it turned out to be a massive con that was sold to people who didn’t need it, want it, or could even claim it. Finally, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) stepped in and said no more, and the PPI claims companies began…


Basically, you’ll get a robo-call saying that you might have been sold PPI and they’ll happily find out for you for no charge. The trouble is, these robo-calls happen ALL THE TIME. However, the end is in sight, as the FCA are ending the compensation claims in 2019. It sounds like they’ll just have to double down on the robo-calls saying that you’ve been in a car accident that wasn’t your fault. I sure hope it wasn’t, as I don’t drive!


I mean, I have a US license, but until I get my act together and take the driving test here, I am permanently riding shotgun in the car. But that’s okay, as I’ve become a slave to the train lines. Ah, the things you do for London. Or to not have to live IN London.


Currently from Chelmsford, I’m commuting about an hour and a half to get to work. Mind you, that’s from my front door to the door of my office. And it varies wildly. Some days I can catch the right train from the station, then hop immediately on to the Underground, then arrive at work in just an hour. A perfect run is a rare beast though. There’s usually a little wait time for different bits of the journey, but that’s to be expected when you’re using multiple forms of public transport.


And before you tell me that’s still a crazy long commute, keep in mind that I’m not driving anything. I routinely have my morning cup of tea, do my makeup, and catch up on the news (or snooze) on the way in. The only real trouble is my commuter rage that flares up on occasion. Mostly on the Tube. Honestly, 90% of the irritants are people standing places they shouldn’t, be it someone standing in the middle of the carriage and not moving in so we can all fit on, or someone standing in the middle of the queue to the ticket barriers so we can’t get out of the station. Basically, for the love of all that is holy, please move away from the centre of everything when using transport in London. Oh, and for heaven’s sake don’t put your bag on a seat. You’re a monster. Put it on your lap or the floor like a civilised human and let another weary worker sit down.


Anyway, best to leave it there before the bitter commuter rage engulfs my soul. Time to think of brighter things, like the glorious sunny weather we’ve been having, or that we’re inching ever closer to moving to Colchester! It sounds like all of the I’s have been dotted and the T’s crossed in terms of actual building, and they’ve booked us in to do a final inspection tour this Friday now that the site inspector has given it his clearance. After that, it’s going to be released to us to move in on 30 June! This is going to mean some rather hasty packing soon. Will be sure to keep you updated!



— Kate

0 views0 comments
  • Kate

First major museum field trip! We were given a section at the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival alongside a good handful of colleagues from around the museum. Our demonstrations were on 3D surface scanning and creating 3D images and prints within the Natural History Museum. But first, I had to get there.


Had a bit of a hiccup Wednesday evening. I had already intended on doing half a day in the office and then heading back up to Chelmsford on the train so M and I could drive down. Unfortunately, either I straight up lost my season ticket holder or someone nicked it. Regardless, I ended up halfway to Liverpool Street Station via the District Line before I realised what had happened. Apparently if you come up to the station staff at the barrier gates with a concerned look on your face and tell them you’ve lost your Oyster card, they’re really pretty helpful. Greater Anglia, not so much. The lady at the desk was lovely enough, but unlike TfL they won’t just replace your lost/stolen card. Even though it’s a SmartPass and all the details are saved in the system that prove it’s me. They were kind enough to freeze the card and let me buy a single ticket home. Ugh.


Thankfully, the monthly passes were both set to expire before I got back from travelling anyway, so that wasn’t too awful. Even better, my manager is a saint and let me work from home for the half day. Probably for the best, as we were definitely not packed the night before in any useful amounts. Eventually, the significant otter left the hospital and we packed up the car to drive the 4.5 hours to Lyme Regis.


The drive was gloriously uneventful and we made it in around 10 pm. Everyone else was already at the cottage and set up, so we all caught up and then headed to bed. It was due to be a busy day the next day.


The next morning was our schools day. Constant streams of small children in washes of different coloured uniforms poured through the doors. Most had the level of excitement and attention you’d expect at that age, but some were genuinely thrilled by the prospect of 3D and microscopes. It’s a beautiful moment to watch the beginnings of a small scientist. 🙂


M had of course come down with me, but obviously wasn’t part of the museum so enjoyed a nice lie in and a wander around the town while the rest of us were up at the Fossil Festival location. At lunchtime I got a break and he and I wandered around together and enjoyed the distinct lack of rain (It’s either full on or off at the English coast. I’m convinced there’s no in between.). This year, the Fossil Festival was being held across the town rather than in one location, so we went to see what other groups were doing, between strolling the beach and eating chips cautiously. (Seriously, the seagulls were downright predatory if you weren’t careful.)


It was a trip to the pub after the event wrapped up for the night and a game of skittles, then a slog up the 14% incline of a hill back to our cottage. (Views like that don’t come for nothing!) The next day was our busiest day of the weekend, and we went out in full force. We scanned objects from fossils to children’s wellies, and showed 3D images from microscopic to full size. The public engagement and honest excitement and interest was fantastic. We guessed from rough estimates that we had probably 230 people come and chat with us.


There was a brief lull around lunchtime, probably due to the lovely weather and hungry children. That was quickly rectified though with an inflatable T. rex costume and a walk down the pier. People seem to want to know where a dinosaur and giggling museum staff are headed. Who would have guessed?


Before we all set off for another trip to another pub for food, it was mandatory for me to go see the grave of Mary Anning. You see, Mary Anning was one of the pioneers in fossil collecting and helped to change the views on what prehistoric life even was. Of course, she was ignored in her own time, despite her accomplishments, and didn’t even get a grave to herself. Instead, she is buried with her brother. Still, she was a really interesting lady that you should read into if you have a free moment. She is the “she sells seashells on the seashore” inspiration behind the tongue twister!


The evening was spent roving the town with my colleagues and M, eventually ending up at a party held at the house of a local fossil collector. I’m still not entirely sure how so many people ended up in such as small area, but it was a riot of a time. Because I am an old lady, M and I bowed out around midnight for home. Most of the rest of the crew didn’t come home until gone 2ish, from what I was told. And who says scientists are boring?


The final day dawned and we all managed to arrive in mostly one piece. Our scanning did get a bit silly as the day went on, but the public seemed to rather enjoy it. I mean really, who doesn’t like a pork pie – digital or real? (Okay okay, maybe just me. But it was good fun!)


It was throwing down sheets of drizzle all day, so having a nice walk at break time was a bit out of the question. At that point though, I was too tired and cold to want more than caffeine and dry shoes. Lesson learned for next year – prepare to get by on a lot less sleep than usual.


At the end of it all though, we all cleared up the location and headed out for one last night on the town with the NHM crew. It was a lovely bonding moment for all of us, and I can see why people come back again and again to do it. I think I may need the year to recover, but it’d be good fun to go back again next time! Now hang on until next week and I’ll tell you about how we got in the car and drove straight for the coasts of the other end of the country.


— Kate

0 views0 comments
  • Kate

Though he still may be occasionally checked for ID at the grocery store, the Significant Otter has reached the big 30th birthday milestone in life. For the last few birthdays we’ve rather made a habit of going abroad for the big day, but for a milestone birthday you should really celebrate with a big to do. And we most definitely did! M invited all of his friends around on the Saturday before the actual day. Ended up with absolutely perfect weather for the BBQ and partied merrily on until the evening at our local pub The Ship nearby. We had such a great time, I rather forgot to take any photos! Ah well, sign of a good party then. 🙂


The following weekend we packed up the surviving decorations and drove out to the Cotswolds to celebrate Birthday Round Two with the family. The weather was not as gloriously perfect, but the day of the party held steady and we enjoyed yet another BBQ. You’ll be unsurprised to find out that most of his presents this year were BBQ or otherwise back garden themed.


He may be in his 30s now, but it doesn’t seem like anything has actually changed all that much. (Though there were vegetables at both BBQs – a sign of the times!)


It was a lovely few weekends with both friends and family, and I’m glad we’re heading back out again next month when my parents get back into the UK for a visit.


— Kate

CONTACT

Thanks for submitting!